Scientific articles

African Female Physicians and Nurses in the Global Care Chain: Qualitative Explorations from Five Destination Countries

Migration of health professionals is an important policy issue for both source and destination countries around the world. The majority of migrant care workers in industrialized countries today are women. However, the dimension of mobility of highly skilled females from countries of the global south has been almost entirely neglected for many years. This paper explores the experiences of high-skilled female African migrant health-workers (MHW) utilising the framework of Global Care Chain (GCC) research.

“Why should I have come here?” - a qualitative investigation of migration reasons and experiences of health workers from sub-Saharan Africa in Austria

Uganda is one of the 57 countries with a critical shortage of health workers. The aim of this study was to determine how the human resources and health service crisis was covered in Ugandan newspapers and, in particular, how the newspapers attributed accountability for problems in the health services. We collected all articles related to health workers and health services for the calendar year 2012 in the two largest national newspapers in Uganda (collection on daily basis) and in one local newspaper (collection on weekly basis).

Portrayal of the Human Resource Crisis and Accountability in Healthcare: A Qualitative Analysis of Ugandan Newspapers

Uganda is one of the 57 countries with a critical shortage of health workers. The aim of this study was to determine how the human resources and health service crisis was covered in Ugandan newspapers and, in particular, how the newspapers attributed accountability for problems in the health services. We collected all articles related to health workers and health services for the calendar year 2012 in the two largest national newspapers in Uganda (collection on daily basis) and in one local newspaper (collection on weekly basis).

Exploring the migration decisions of health workers and trainees from Africa: A meta-ethnographic synthesis

The migration of healthcare workers from Africa depletes countries already suffering from substantial staffing shortages and considerable disease burdens. The recruitment of such individuals by high income countries has been condemned by the World Health Organisation. However, understanding the reasons why healthcare workers migrate is essential, in order to attempt to alter migration decisions. This article covers the research that aimed to systematically analyse factors influencing healthcare workers' decisions to migrate from Africa

Human resources for health in Botswana: The results of in-country database and reports analysis

Botswana is a large middle-income country in Southern Africa with a population of just over two million. Shortage of human resources for health is blamed for the inability to provide high quality accessible health services. There is however a lack of integrated, comprehensive and readily-accessible data on the health workforce. The aim of this study was to analyse the existing databases on health workforce in Botswana in order to quantify the human resources for health.

Security and skills: the two key issues in health worker migration

Migration of health workers from Africa continues to undermine the universal provision of quality health care. South Africa is an epicentre for migration it exports more health workers to high income countries than any other African country and imports health workers from its lower-income neighbours to fill the gap.

The inverse primary care law in sub-Saharan Africa

Many low-income and middle-income countries globally are now pursuing ambitious plans for universal primary care, but are failing to deliver adequate care quality because of intractable human resource problems. Through 66 semi-structured interviews of health workers that migrated to Europe (UK, Belgium, and Austria) or southern Africa (Botswana and South Africa) from sub- Saharan Africa, the researches want to understand why these migrants did not wish to take up available posts in primary and first-contact care in their home countries.

Why sub-Saharan African health workers migrate to European countries that do not actively recruit: a qualitative study post-migration

Many studies have investigated the migration intentions of sub-Saharan African medical students and health professionals within the context of a legacy of active international recruitment by receiving countries. However, many health workers migrate outside of this recruitment paradigm. This paper aims to explore the reasons for migration of health workers from sub-Saharan Africa to Belgium and Austria; European countries without a history of active recruitment in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: Data were collected using semistructured interviews.

Training for health services and systems research in Sub-Saharan Africa - a case study at four East and Southern African Universities

The need to develop capacity for health services and systems research (HSSR) in low and middle income countries has been highlighted in a number of international forums. However, little is known about the level of HSSR training in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). An assesement was conducted at four major East and Southern African universities to describe: a) the numbers of HSSR PhD trainees at these institutions, b) existing HSSR curricula and mode of delivery, and c) motivating and challenging factors for PhD training, from the trainees’experience.

Why there is an inverse primary-care law in Africa

Between July, 2011, and April, 2012,a series of semi-structured interviews were held to explore the reasons why migrant health workers from sub-Saharan Africa had not taken up vacant posts to deliver primary care or first-contact care in their own countries, but had instead migrated to Europe (interviewees in Belgium, the UK, or Austria) or to southern African countries (interviewees in South Africa, Botswana).

Developing family medicine in Africa

An article on the growth of a speciality that is beginning to flourish, despite obstacles on its path.

 

Understanding of family medicine in Africa: a qualitative study of leaders’ views.

Understanding leaders’ views on family medicine in Africa,  a qualitative study with in-depth interviews in nine sub-Saharan African countries.  

 

 

From "patient" to "person" to "people": the need for integrated, people-centered healthcare

This paper proposes a theoretical framework which identifies the major elements of people-centered care. Prof. Jan De Maeseneer and Lieve Daeren of the HURAPRIM UGhent team contributed to this article, focusing on the fact that people centered care is basically primary health care- and community centered and that a primary health care policy should be coherently traduced in human capacity (national policies on training, financing, working conditions & retention of PHC workers).     

Effect of UK policy on medical migration: a time series analysis of physician registration data

Economically developed countries have recruited large numbers of overseas health workers to fill domestic shortages. Recognition of the negative impact this can have on health care in developing countries led the United Kingdom Department of Health to issue a Code of Practice for National Health Service (NHS) employers in 1999 providing ethical guidance on international recruitment. Case reports suggest this guidance had limited influence in the context of other NHS policy priorities.

Tackling non-communicable diseases (NCDs): a different approach is needed

The NCD Alliance aims to put non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on the global agenda to address the NCD crisis. Improving outcomes in morbidity and mortality by 2015 will clearly depend to a large extent on tackling the burden of NCDs, especially in developing countries.